Lynne’s Birthday Gift

fun activities

Cat, Blue, Jane & Lynne in Denver

Lynne and I wanted to give Aunt Jane a birthday present on her 82nd birthday. She is my sister and Lynne’s cherished Aunt who had the courage to throw off society’s expectations of housewives, and serve the under privileged. She lobbied for compassionate legislation for children with handicaps in Colorado, lived with children in impoverished orphanages in Mexico, counseled Guatemalan refugees who fled the genocides in Guatemala until she returned with them broker peaceful returns to distrusting survivors. Along with those missions, she inspired her entire family to reunite and embrace her independence.
I gave Lynne the phone so she could sing happy birthday to her while I shouted it through the plexiglass in the Aegis Outdoor Living Room. Then Lynne had a private conversation with her.
Jane is a talker. Lynne is a listener. She focused on every word. I heard Lynne’s responses: “Oh, yeah.” I’m not sure.” “Well, I have a lot of friends here.” “It is what it is.” “I can see family.” “I get out and do things.” “I’m never sure.” “They have us do things, you know.”
Suddenly Lynne said, “Oh, no!”
She put her hand over the phone and said to me, “Cat broke her toe.”
Cat is Lynne’s cousin, a nurse. I asked, “Is she still working?”
“Oh yes.”
Finally, she tired and handed the phone back to me.
Jane said, “We had a great conversation. She’s handling it so well, accepting what is.”
And that inspiration was another gift Lynne gave Aunt Jane. And me. And everyone.

A Normal Video Chat in an Oasis

Fun Activities

A caregiver and Lynne called Sunday night for no reason other than to video chat. No tears, no fears. Almost normal. 

I told her I had a scan scheduled for Tuesday and had to avoid chocolates for 24 hours beforehand, so I was going to have chocolate cake for breakfast. She laughed.

I asked if she was eating lunch in her bedroom or with other residents. She didn’t know. “I haven’t paid attention to that. They have places on the floor and the tables, so we’ll be safe.” 

She had the new book in her hands from her sister Pam. She took the flyleaf off and scanned it and scanned the book, hesitating as she read each word in the title. “I’m excited about it.

Ok, remember when you get a new book you have to return one for me. Return Bear Town because I hadn’t read it yet.”

The caregiver was still there so he looked for it in her shelves. She said, “No, it’s not there,”

She tugged back her blanket and sheet to rummaged through them until she found a couple of books and found it. She gave it to the caregiver to leave with the concierge.

We chatted for 18 minutes. I updated her on Pam suffering in wildfire smoke, her niece liking her visit to Lynne’s alma mater Oregon, and on an on. She responded with understanding to each one.  When I paused wondering what to say, she said, “Well, I should go.”

We told each other we loved each other.

Those oases of normalcy are normal with Alzheimer’s. They are abnormally wonderful to experience and share. And I believe her cognitive clarity was also helped by the major reduction in COVID inactive isolation.  She’s escorted outside daily, exercising regularly, walking her floor, helping fellow residents, getting video chats.

Whatever, we persist and give thanks for each oasis.